Variational Analysis Down Under 2018

Dear Optimisation Group members,

We are delighted to announce the Variational Analysis Down Under (VADU2018) workshop in honour of Prof. Asen Dontchev.

The workshop will take place on 19–21 February at Federation University Australia in Ballarat. The workshop is sponsored by AMSI and Federation University Australia. Please stay tuned for future announcements.

Warmest regards,
Vera Roshchina.

Katharine Turner, Persistent homology rank function

Speaker: Dr Katharine Turner
Australian National University
Title: Persistent homology rank function
Date and time: Monday 13 November 2017, 10:30am
Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus

Abstract:
Persistent homology is a tool for capturing how topological features evolve over an increasing family of spaces. Commonly these spaces are taken to be the unions of balls of increasing radii about some finite set of points. Using this scaling parameter we can summarise geometric information as a topological summary statistic. In this talk I will introduce persistent homology and define the persistent homology rank function which, as a functional summary lying in a Hilbert space, enables us to perform statistical analysis such as principal component analysis. I will present some applications including testing complete spatial randomness of spatial point patterns, and comparing experimental sphere packings and colloid data under different temperatures. This talk is based on work with Vanessa Robins.

CIAO Talk, Reinier Diaz Millan: On the splitting optimization problem with enlargement

CIAO Talk, Reinier Diaz Millan: On the splitting optimization problem with enlargement

Speaker: Dr Reinier Diaz Millan
Federal Institute of Goias
Title: On the splitting optimization problem with enlargement
Date and time: 11:30am, Thursday 16 November 2017
Location: Room T121, Mt Helen Campus (this is at Federation University, RMIT crowd please connect via Visimeet).

Abstract:
In this paper, we present two approximate versions of the forward-backward splitting method for solving the minimization problem. In both cases, the objective function is the sum of two convex functions, maybe not differentiable. The algorithms involve, at each iteration, inexact evaluations of the backward operator and approximate subgradients of the functions (namely: the ε-subgradients). The first method considers an absolutely summable error criterion, whereas the second method uses a relative error criterion recently introduced for approximating proximal operators. Various stepsize rules are considered, including both diminishing and non-vanishing stepsizes, and convergence in objective values and convergence to a neighbourhood of the optimal set are obtained. The convergence analysis of the two methods shares underlying elements. Read more

International Conference on Optimization and Decision Science, September 10-13, 2018, in Taormina, Italy

 

ODS2018 – International Conference on Optimization and Decision Science
XLVIII Annual Meeting of AIRO – Italian Operations Research Society
Hotel Villa Diodoro, Taormina, Italy
September 10-13, 2018

www.airoconference.it/ods2018

 

Dear Colleague,

ODS2018, the international conference on Optimization and Decision Science, is organized by AIRO, Italian Operations Research Society, in cooperation
with DMI (Department of Mathematics and Computer Science) of the University of Catania.

It will be held at Hotel Villa Diodoro, September 10-13, 2018, in Taormina, Italy.

Read more

Kate Smith-Miles: Optimization in the Darkness of Uncertainty: when you don’t know what you don’t know, and what you do know isn’t much!

Kate Smith-Miles: Optimization in the Darkness of Uncertainty: when you don’t know what you don’t know, and what you do know isn’t much!

Speaker: Prof. Kate Smith-Miles
University of Melbourne
Title: Optimization in the Darkness of Uncertainty: when you don’t know what you don’t know, and what you do know isn’t much!
Date and time: Monday 6 November 2017, 3:30–4:30pm
Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus

Abstract:
How do we find the optimal solution for a constrained multiobjective optimisation problem when we have no analytical expression for the objective functions, and very limited function evaluations within the huge search space due to the expense of measuring the objective functions? Calculus can’t help you, and trial and error is not an option! This talk will describe a common practical optimisation problem found in many industrial settings with these challenges, and introduce some methods for expensive black-box optimisation. Finally, we will address the question of how best to evaluate the performance of such methods by generating new test instances with controllable characteristics. Read more

7th International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems

7th International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems

Dear Optimisation group members, the following Operations Research conference announcement in Madeira, Portugal may be of your interest. Note a stellar selection of speakers. Thanks to Marc Demange for the information.

7th International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems

Late-Breaking Submission Deadline:  November 2, 2017

Conference venue: Madeira, Portugal.

http://www.icores.org/


Dear Colleague,

Deadline approaching: ICORES 2018 offers the research community a chance to submit late breaking results, by November 2. This is a hard deadline and will not be extended

We would like to highlight the fact that all papers accepted at ICORES 2018 will be published in the SCITEPRESS DLIB and submitted for indexation by:
DBLP, Thomson-Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index, INSPEC, EI and SCOPUS.

Furthermore, all authors of papers accepted as full papers will be offered the possibility to publish extended revised versions in a post-publication book by Springer.

Finally, it is important to note that the technical program of this international conference will include several special sessions, workshops, tutorials and will count on contributions from remarkable distinguished speakers, such as:

Aharon Ben-Tal, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

Aaron Burciaga, Accenture, United States

Abdelkader Sbihi, EM Normandie, France

Looking forward to receiving your paper submission by November 2.

To submit go to the conference website(http://www.icores.org/) and click on “Submit Paper”.

 

Kind regards,

Vera Coelho

ICORES Secretariat

 

Address: Av. D. Manuel I, 27A 2Esq, 2910-595 Setubal, Portugal

Tel: +351 265 100 033

Web:   http://www.icores.org/

e-mail: icores.secretariat@insticc.org

CIAO seminar: Hyperbolic polynomials and semidefinite programming

Speaker: Dr James Saunderson
Monash University

Time and Location: Thursday, 19 October, 10:30 AM, T121, T Building, Mt Helen Campus (Federation University)

Title: Hyperbolic polynomials and semidefinite programming

Abstract: Hyperbolic polynomials are multivariate homogeneous polynomials with certain real-rootedness properties, such as the determinant restricted to symmetric matrices. First identified in the context of PDEs, they now play a role in numerous areas, including theoretical computer science, probability theory, and optimisation. Associated with any hyperbolic polynomial is a convex `hyperbolicity’ cone. The resulting conic optimisation problems are called hyperbolic programs.

Please contact Julien Ugon regarding the Visimeet connection. RMIT crowd please make your own arrangements with AGR booking/Visimeet connection.

Download flyer

CSIT Seminar: Prof. Yuhui Shi, Introduction to Brain Storm Optimization Algorithms

CSIT Seminar

Speaker: Prof. Yuhui Shi
Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech), Shenzhen, China
Title: Introduction to Brain Storm Optimization Algorithms

Date: Tuesday 3 October 2017
Time: 11:30 – 12:30
Venue: 09.03.12 (Building 9, Level 3, Room 12), RMIT City Campus

Abstract: Swarm intelligence (SI) algorithms, a collection of population-based optimization algorithms, have been being designed and researched to solve problems which are very difficult, if not impossible, for traditional optimization approaches such as hill-climbing approaches to solve. Most existing SI algorithms are nature-inspired and/or bio-inspired, especially are inspired by objects with low level intelligence. Inspired by the brainstorming process, one of the human being problem solving skills, in the year 2011, the brain storm optimization (BSO) algorithm, a new population-based swarm intelligence algorithm, was developed. In this talk, the brainstorming process will be introduced first, followed by the development of the brain storm optimization algorithm; then new advances on BSO will be presented; finally, the BSOs will be looked at from the developmental learning perspective.

Bio: Dr. Yuhui Shi is a Chair Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech), Shenzhen, China. Before joining SUSTech, he was with the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU), Suzhou, China, from January 2008 to August 2017, and was with the Electronic Data Systems Corporation (EDS), Indiana, USA, from October 1998 to December 2007. He is an IEEE Fellow, the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Swarm Intelligence Research, and an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation. Dr. Shi co-authored a book on Swarm Intelligence together with Dr. James Kennedy and Dr. Russell C. Eberhart, and another book on Computational Intelligence: Concept to Implementation together with Dr. Russell C. Eberhart.

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Nigel Clay: Ensuring Blood is Available When it is Needed Most

Nigel Clay: Ensuring Blood is Available When it is Needed Most

Dear Optimisation group members,

Please note the following Biomodelling talk tomorrow (Friday 22 September) that may be of your interest.

Speaker: Nigel Clay
School of Science, RMIT University

Title: Ensuring Blood is Available When it is Needed Most

Date and time: Friday 22 September 2017, 3:00–4:00pm
Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus

Abstract: A robust supply Red Blood Cells (RBCs) is needed to meet patient demand for transfusion. The quantity of blood transfused is doubly stochastic as both the number of patients needing transfusion and the quantity of blood a patient needs are random. We define a shortage as the situation where RBCs are needed for transfusion but none are available. Shortages may arise because unused RBCs perish, and/or because the supply of RBCs is not sufficient to cover demand. For hospitals, the supply of fresh RBCs comes from the Blood Bank. However, the Blood Bank has to rely on donations which are also stochastic. Further, once a donor has given whole blood they are ineligible to do so again for 84 days. Therefore, to ensure a robust supply of RBCs is available is important to ensure that a sufficient quantity of donors are available to give blood. Read more

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