RMITOpt Seminar – August the 17th: Dr Lizhen Shao, University of Science and Technology Beijing, China

Speaker: Dr  Lizhen Shao, School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, China.

Title:  Approximation of Convex Bodies by Multiple Objective Optimization and an Application in Reachable Sets

Date and Time:  Friday, August 17th, 2018 3.00pm – 4.00pm

Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus (To connect via visimeet  please contact rmitopt@rmit.edu.au)

Abstract:    In this talk, we focus on approximating convex compact bodies. For a convex body described as the feasible set in objective space of a multiple objective programme, we show that finding it is equivalent to finding the non-dominated set of a multiple objective programme. This equivalence implies that convex bodies can be approximated using multiple objective optimization algorithms. Therefore, we propose a revised outer approximation algorithm for convex multiple objective programming problems to approximate convex bodies. Finally, we apply the algorithm to solve reachable sets of control systems and use numerical examples to show the effectiveness of the algorithm.

 

Bio:  Dr Lizhen Shao was born in China. She did her PhD study on multicriteria optimization with Professor Matthias Ehrgott at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Since 2009 she has been working at the School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, China. Now she is an Associate Professor there.

RMITOpt Seminar – August the 3rd, 2018: The Information Geometry of Sensing

  Speaker: Dr Simon Williams, Senior Fellow in Dynamical Systems, at the University of Melbourne

Title:  The Information Geometry of Sensing

Date and Time:  Friday, August 3rd, 3.00pm – 4.00pm

Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus (To connect via visimeet  please contact rmitopt@rmit.edu.au)

Abstract:    Information Geometry is the application of differential geometry to statistical estimation allowing parameters to take values on a manifold. The main results have been limited to one dimension and even then the curves have been embedded in a surrounding flat space. In this talk I will outline an application of information geometry to statistical signal processing of sensors that exercises higher dimensional manifolds intrinsically. Here the problem is to estimate the parameters of a target from the noisy measurements of a sensor. Not only can we describe how the information derived by the sensor behaves as the target moves, but we can also see how that varies as we change the parameters of the sensor too. This opens up a whole new area of analysis where target and sensor compete for the information available. This is joint work with Prof Bill Moran and Arthur Suvorov.

 

Bio:  Simon was born in Germany while his father was on sabbatical there, but grew up in Melbourne and then Adelaide, where did his undergraduate studies in Mathematical Physics and Pure Mathematics. I went to Oxford to do graduate study with Roger Penrose on general relativity and conformal field theory (although both of these reduce to differential equations if you stare at them hard enough!) Since returning to Australia he has lectured at Adelaide University, worked as a radar signal processor at DSTO, a grammatical model builder at CSIRO, and lectured again, much better, at Flinders University before moving to Melbourne to work with Prof Bill Moran on pure and applied signal processing.

Talk by Dr Sona Taheri, May the 25th

  Speaker: Dr Sona Taheri, Federation University

Title:  Optimization based clustering algorithm and its application in cyber security

Date and Time:  Friday, May 25th, 3.00pm – 4.00pm

Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus (To connect via visimeet  please contact rmitopt@rmit.edu.au)

Abstract:    In this talk, an optimization formulation of the clustering problem will be presented and a new clustering algorithm based on this formulation will be introduced. A real life application of the proposed algorithm will be discussed by looking at the identification of false alerts generated by intrusion detection system.

 

Bio:  Research Fellow in Internet Commerce Security Laboratory (ICSL) at Federation University Australia. The current research interests include developing algorithms based on optimization and data mining approaches to enhance security in computer networks. Received PhD degree from Federation University Australia in 2012.

Abstracts for AMSI Optimise closing soon


ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS CLOSE SOON for AMSI OPTIMISE 2018 (on May 21st)

Returning in 2018, AMSI Optimise is an annual networking and research-training event that aims to strengthen mathematical optimisation research engagement and its applications across industry.

This event will comprise a three-day industry-focused conference, followed by a two-day research workshop. The symposium features expert and end-user talks, international guest speakers, collaboration showcases, industry challenge sessions and tutorials.

We are accepting abstracts for the poster session on Day 3 and workshop talks on Days 4 & 5 of the event under the conference themes of Humanitarian Applications and Decision Making Under Uncertainty.

Poster Session
The Poster Session on Day 3 will include a series of brief poster presentations, and is expected to be attended by conference delegates from industry as well as university-based delegates. This is a great opportunity to showcase your research to a wide audience and build your networks.
Workshop Talks

The Workshop Talks will be held on Days 4 & 5 of AMSI Optimise, limited to 30 minutes per talk including any question time. The audience is expected to mainly consist of university-based delegates.

Please limit your abstract to approximately 150-200 words and indicate whether you would prefer to submit a poster or present a workshop talk. Abstract submissions close Monday 21 May.

Up to $500 in prizes will be awarded to the best posters!

Submit your Abstract

Program and Abstracts now Available for the Workshop on Fixed Points and Applications

The program and abstract for the Workshop on Fixed Points and Applications can now be accessed via the RMITOpt webpage: http://sites.rmit.edu.au/rmitopt/fpaa/

Where: RMIT AGR room – building 8 level 9 room 66
Date: Monday 21st of May
Registration: Please send an email to rmitopt@rmit.edu.au if you wish to participate. There is no registration fee.

Confirmed speakers:

Hong Kun Xu – Hangzhou Dianzi University
Markus Hegland – ANU
Scott Lindstrom – University of  Newcastle
Hoa Bui – Federation University
Alex Kruger – Federation University
Janosch Rieger  –  Monash University
Nadezda Sukhorukov – Swinburne University
Vera Roshchina – RMIT
Andrew Eberhard – RMIT

Talk by Dr Pambos Evripidou, May the 11th

Speaker: Dr Charalambos (Pambos) Evripidou, LaTrobe University

Title:  Lehmer’s problem and Coxeter polynomials

Date and Time:  Friday, May 11th, 3.00pm – 4.00pm

Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus (To connect via visimeet  please contact rmitopt@rmit.edu.au)

Abstract:    

Bio:  I am a postdoctoral researcher at La Trobe University, working with Reinout Quispel. Before joining La Trobe University at 2017, I held a postdoctoral position at University of Cyprus. My main research area is on integrable systems but I have done some work on group and number theoretic related problems. My talk will be on such a problem, which originated from the need of finding large prime numbers.

One Day Workshop on “Fixed Points and Applications”

RMITOpt is taking the opportunity provided by the visit of Professor Hong-Kun, to hold a one day
workshop on “Fixed points and Applications”. Prof. Hong Kun Xu is a distinguished professor
at Hangzhou Dianzi University in Hangzhou, China.

Where: RMIT AGR room – building 8 level 9 room 66 RMIT
Date: Monday 21st of May
Registration: Please send an email to rmitopt@rmit.edu.au if you wish to participate. There is no registration fee but we need numbers for catering purposes.

Confirmed speakers:
Hong Kun Xu – Hangzhou Dianzi University
Markus Hegland – ANU
Scott Lindstrom – University of Newcastle
Hoa Bui – Federation University
Alex Kruger – Federation University
Janosch Rieger – Monash University
Nadezda Sukhorukov – Swinburne University
Vera Roshchina – RMIT
Andrew Eberhard – RMIT

It is intended to interpret this theme as broadly as possible i.e. to include but not restricted to the following:
– Fixed point theory
– Projection methods for feasibility problems
– Fractal derived from iterated function systems
– Application in signal processing
– Applications in approximation

Kind Regards (Program team)
Andrew Eberhard and Vera Roshchina

AMSI OPTIMISE 2018, SUBMISSIONS CLOSE 21 MAY

SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT TO PRESENT AT AMSI OPTIMISE 2018
SUBMISSIONS CLOSE 21 MAY

Returning in 2018, AMSI Optimise is an annual networking and research-training event that aims to strengthen mathematical optimisation research engagement and its applications across industry.

This event will comprise a three-day industry-focused conference, followed by a two-day research workshop. The symposium features expert and end-user talks, international guest speakers, collaboration showcases, industry challenge sessions and tutorials.

We are accepting abstracts for the poster session on Day 3 and workshop talks on Days 4 & 5 of the event under the conference themes of Humanitarian Applications and Decision Making Under Uncertainty.

Poster Session
The Poster Session on Day 3 will include a series of brief poster presentations, and is expected to be attended by conference delegates from industry as well as university-based delegates. This is a great opportunity to showcase your research to a wide audience and build your networks.
Workshop Talks

The Workshop Talks will be held on Days 4 & 5 of AMSI Optimise, limited to 30 minutes per talk including any question time. The audience is expected to mainly consist of university-based delegates.

Please limit your abstract to approximately 150-200 words and indicate whether you would prefer to submit a poster or present a workshop talk. Abstract submissions close Monday 21 May.

Up to $500 in prizes will be awarded to the best posters!

Submit your Abstract

RMITOpt Talk: Extending de Bruijn’s Identity – Prof. Bill Moran

   

Speaker: Prof. Bill Moran

Title:  Extending de Bruijn’s Identity

Date and Time:  Friday, April 27th, 3.00pm – 4.00pm

Location: Building 8 Level 9 Room 66 (AGR) RMIT City campus (To connect via visimeet  please contact rmitopt@rmit.edu.au)

Abstract:    The de Bruijn’s identity is a classical result in Information. Theory relating two well-known measures of information in distributions: Shannon Entropy and Fisher Information. It measures, in terms of the Fisher Information, how the entropy of a distribution increases as it evolves under Brownian noise. The original identity was proved for distributions on the real line, but is not hard to extend to n dimensions.

Our work has attempted to find analogues in the context of Riemannian manifolds. There, it is not even clear, ab initio, what the statement of the theorem should be. Our approach requires extension of the notion of Intrinsic Fisher Information to Riemannian manifolds. From this we are able to show that a probabilistic solution to the heat equation results in a heat equation for the entropy density of this solution, but with a source term that arises from the Fisher Information density. Combined with the Li-Yau inequality this lead to bounds on the rate of increase of entropy on a manifold. The seminar will discuss ideas around Fisher Information, forms on manifolds, and the heat equation, as well as a little history of the identity.  This is joint work with Stephen Howard (DST Edinburgh), Doug Cochran (Arizona State U).

Bio:  Professor Bill Moran currently is in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at The University of Melbourne. Previously he served as the Director of Signal Processing and Sensor Control Group in the School of Engineering, at RMIT and before that Director of the Defence Science Institute (2011–2014) in the University of Melbourne,  Professor of Mathematics (’76–’91), Head of the Department of Pure Mathematics (’77–’79, ’84–’86), Dean of Mathematical and Computer Sciences (’81, ’82, ’89) at the University of Adelaide, and Head of the Mathematics Discipline at the Flinders University of South Australia (’91–’95), during which time he worked in various roles in CSSIP. He was a member of the Australian Research Council College of Experts (2007-09).   He was elected to the Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science in 1984. He holds a Ph.D. in Pure Mathematics from the University of Sheffield, UK (’68), and a First Class Honours B.Sc. in Mathematics from the University of Birmingham (’65). He has been a Principal Investigator on numerous research grants and contracts, in areas spanning pure mathematics to radar development, from both Australian and US Research Funding Agencies, including DARPA, AFOSR, AFRL, Australian Research Council (ARC), and DSTO. His main areas of research interest are in signal processing both theoretically and in applications to radar, waveform design and radar theory, sensor networks, and sensor management. He also works in various areas of mathematics including harmonic analysis, representation theory, and number theory.

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