Think Pair Share

A common way to engage students and create discussion in a class is a think- pair-share activity.

To get it started you need:

  1. a question prompt
  2. clear instructions

 

The question:

The question should be something more than just a straight forward yes or no, it might be a calculation, brainstorming activity, or knowledge recall.

 

The instructions:

The instructions should be clear (consistent if you use it regularly throughout the course).

  • have a defined time for the thinking
  • have a suggestion of how to find someone to pair with
  • comment on how sharing will be conducted.

This is all particularly important when teaching online.

 

In collaborate – did you know if students go to the participant list and click on another participants name – they can have a private chat? Maybe this is how pairing can happen, students can share their ideas in pairs using chat – before they share their ideas to the class using chat, text or an external tool (Forms, Go Soap Box).

 

Example 1:

A slide displaying and example of think and share -  "What makes something good? (2 mins), Please take a moment to think about what makes a learning experience good. Please write your observations, comments or ideas into the chat.
Example of think/share used in collaborate ultra. There is no paring in this task.

 

Example 2:

Slide showing a think pair share activity. Text - Activity 1: think-pair-share. icot Individually (30 seconds) Think about the last time your struggled to turn on a tap. icon Pair (2 minutes) Why do you think this is? icon Share: 30 seconds
A think pair share activity used in a face to face keynote.

 

Think pair share activities are valuable ways to encourage peer to peer discussions in large groups. There are a range of other strategies you can use in face to face, asynchronous and online session to enable discussions and support the building of community.

 

Any questions? Feel free to contact us at Seh.adg.let@rmit.edu.au 

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